Celebrate the dupattas!

This elegant piece of clothing was always open to tremendous ways of dressing up our ensemble. Traditionally a dupatta was worn to denote modesty and worn on the upper part of the body as an “odhni”, “chunri” or dupatta.

You can fashion out a dupatta with a variety of materials – from the sheer georgette, chiffon, chanderi, tussar to the traditional embroidered fabrics. And with the handwoven extravaganza in silk brocades of Kanchipuram and Benares.

The upper part is a lighter drape and in Tamilnadu young girls wear it as a “dhavani” or a half saree. In Kerala, it is worn over a “mundu” and in Assam it is worn over the mekhela, the sarong.

In the embroidery realm, the dupattas of “phulkari’ of Punjab and “kutch” of Gujarat were an integral part of the “odhni” tradition. The ancient pen kalamkari and block printed kalamkari techniques also found its way of creating rich patterning and a brighter spectrum into traditional dupattas.

At Sundari silks, we customise and weave the Kanchipuram silk dupattas – From 35 inches width to 47 inches (saree panna), the Kanchipuram silk dupattas come in 2.5 metres length. Ideally worn as dupattas to jazz up your plain outfits, it can be repurposed to wear it as a half saree, or over a lehnga too. The handwoven dupattas come with rich traditional motifs and contrast borders deriving inspiration directly from our “pattu pudavais”

Dupattas are back in action accessorizing western wear and Indian ethnic dresses like kurtas, lehngas. The head-turning piece has truly been repurposed and repositioned giving a vibrant spin to our wardrobes!

Pic credit – Wikipedia

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